Healing of Memories Year-End Reunion.

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The Healing of Memories and Reconciliation, Social Cohesion, Networking and Partnerships year-end function was a resounding success of sharing, fellowship and robust dialogue. The event was well attended by KwaZulu-Natal Christian Council’s ecumenical partners and government officials. KZNCC Deputy CEO on Theology, Dr Lucas Ngoetjana, facilitated the robust dialogue that inspired the attendees to engage vigorously. They also came up with solution-oriented responses to topical issues including social cohesion, xenophobia, homophobia and gender-based violence, among others.

Bridget Phillips, a facilitator from the Institute For Healing of Memories, explained that the bulk of her work was about creating safe and sacred spaces where people can begin the journey of acknowledging the pain and letting go of what’s destructive inside them and being willing to leave the past behind. “The Healing of Memories (HoM) methodology has been tried and tested. It’s about taking the bondage off the wound, putting it in salty water and cleaning it. There’s guaranteed confidentiality during these sessions.”

Phillips also emphasised that healing is not an event but a lengthy-involved process of different phases. She urged everyone, especially men, to use the HoM tools as they enter their new journey in life after the workshops.

Rev Bernard Coopasamy of The Christ Tabloid newspaper shared how his Christianity had transformed him having been born into Hinduism. He believes this in itself was a healing process in his life. “Being invited to inter-faith groups changed my perspective on numerous things and this was when I embraced the healing process and social cohesion from there on,” he explained. This change inspired the concept of The Christ Tabloid newspaper which he said promotes social cohesion and seeks to “educated God’s people and bring their lives back in alignment to the Christ”.

There was a platform for people to share their stories and what moulded them into being the change-makers that they have become in society. Nomusa Shabalala, Anti-Xenophobia Community Facilitator and leader of Sisters of Faith in Action (SOFIA), a women’s movement at KZNCC, said that she was excited and proud to see women being well represented at the event. She spoke about the trip they took to Tanzania as SOFIA, learn about Village Community Banking (VICOBA) where they gained women empowerment skills including making clothes softeners, cheese paste and the VICOBA way of banking.

Keeping the enlightening conversations going, Mama Mngadi of Family Unity Organisation said strengthening family ties was important in counter-acting the societal challenges. “It’s one of the pillars that could potentially help us win against any social ills as they are a result of diminishing united and well-ground families.” Radio is another platform where these issues can be sufficiently tackled. Ps Victus Mthembu, responsible for Media and Publicity at KZNCC, said this platform had positioned the organisation in a positive light as a brand. Mthembu spoke about the Gender Justice programme in partnership with the Premier’s Office, in tackling gender-based violence, meted out against women and children.

Dr Douglas Dziva, CEO of KZNCC, concluded the proceedings as saying it was a good way to close off the year. “It was good sharing what is critical and important to us. It was well facilitated and inspiring, engaging and interesting.” Dziva also thanked the various key stakeholders and partners that KZNCC has had over the years.